SCREENWRITING

  • JAYNE’S COLOURFUL STORIES AND POEMS ON CBEEBIES RADIO!

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Poetry, Children's stories, Children's TV, Education, Screenwriting

    Had to abandon several plans this summer because those lovely people at CBeebies Radio asked me to to write some stories and poems for them sharpish. Hopefully my friends, real and imaginary, didn’t feel too neglected and they, especially if they’re under six years old, will enjoy the results. You can hear them from today on the BBC iplayer radio app, just look for the Cbeebies bug! Then from next Monday 6th November you can download my story The Paintpots from the CBeebies website

    The following Monday your little ones will be able to hear all about a quite magnificent Sock Drawer!

    And in between listen out for poems about the sounds of colours – how do they sound to you?

    Developing and writing these was a blast and an education. Here are some of the key things I learnt during this project:
    – Yellow is an existential colour
    – D.H. Lawrence has a lot to answer for
    – Snail snot should never be underestimated

    None of these conclusions found their way into the CBeebies material, you’ll no doubt be happy to learn. Instead, your preschoolers will enjoy discovering, for example that:
    The colour yellow is a primary colour
    But it’s a great mixer and go between.
    If blue gets all flustered, yellow really cuts the mustard,
    Shouting, “Bananas in custard!
    Hey look: we’ve made green!”

  • #TCMC I HEART SHEFFIELD

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Animation, Books, Business Trips, Children's Media Campaign, Children's Poetry, Children's TV, Screenwriting, The Children's Media Foundation, travel

    By train and plane, taxi and car
    We’re travelling to Sheffield from Stroud and afar.
    Like migrating wilderbeasts, salmon and toads
    Although hopefully not eaten or squashed on the road.
    On pizzas and parties we’ll spare no expense
    At the annual Children’s Media Conf’rence!

    I’m producing, tomorrow, the Opening Sesh
    It’s a Question Time thing, in which we will flesh
    Out the bones of kids’ media policy and stuff
    And probably mention Brexit but without flimflam or guff
    On panellists (and poets) we spare no expense
    At the annual Children’s Media Conf’rence!

    I’m over excited, I’m sure you can tell
    Writers don’t get out much, oh you knew that as well.
    Jayne World has gone all sing song with rhyme
    But I’ll try to control it most of the time
    On potions to pacify me, spare no expense
    At the annual Children’s Media Conf’rence!

  • MY EPISODE OF LITTLE ROY IS ON I-PLAYER AND IT’S GRAND!

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Animation, Children's stories, Children's TV, Parenting, Screenwriting, Uncategorized

    Oh this was fun to write! Have you seen Roy on CBBC? The cartoon boy in a real world. Well this is the prequel – Roy is five years old instead of ten. So it’s less about fitting in and more about finding out. He is a great character and the show is a lovely crossover from preschool to big kid content and I was very pleased to be involved.

    This episode, Dr Roy, which involves bandages, biscuits and a ‘ba-doom ba-doom’ big hearted little boy, was broadcast a week or so back on CBeebies and of course I missed it. But hooray for catch up telly! If you would like to watch it, then here’s the web address: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08ffx89/little-roy-18-doctor-roy

  • IN THE SAME ROOM AS GRAYSON PERRY AND CLARE BALDING!

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Media Campaign, Children's stories, Children's TV, Music, Parenting, Screenwriting

    And having too good a time to tweet about it.

    This was on Wednesday, at the Broadcast Awards at Grosvenor House. I hope they had as good a time as me, although as nominees (or rather part of shows that had been nominated), they might not have been as relaxed as me, a judge, could be. I had done my bit watching and reviewing the programmes submitted for the Children’s 6-12 and 0-6 categories, then discussing with my fellow judges before voting. All I had to do now was enjoy the champagne and glitz.

    There was quite a lot of glitz: dinner included some Sweet Pea Emulsion which I have only seen before on a Dulux colour chart, the bits of stem broccoli that usually fall through my colander, turnips the size of snowdrop bulbs and for pudding we had a dessert. That involved yuzo: Alison Moyet, what a great voice.

    Jonathan Ross presided over the award ceremony which, despite him, seemed endless – about lots of programmes that I haven’t watched or did watch but have forgotten. But there was plenty of wine on the table and ooh, a bit of slate with some rather lovely petits fours that I was probably meant to pass round the table.

    The older kids’ award went to My Life: The Boy on the Bicycle, a CBBC documentary (directed by Stefania Buonajuti) following a lad round one of the largest refugee camps in the world. If you are one of those people that talks about ‘these people’ then you need to see this.

    The preschool award went to Topsy and Tim. An outstanding episode in an already excellent series. Written by Dave Ingham, the episode is about a pet dog dying. It is handled with such care, wit and honesty that it made me cry. I was genuinely moved by the story. I also cried because I still haven’t worked with producers Darrall Macqueen.

    I didn’t stay until ‘Carriages at Three’ but left sensibly early, determined to get a good night’s sleep so that, with a new day, inspired by these great shows, I could work harder and write better. And find out when yuzu left the music industry and moved into citrus fruit based desserts.

  • I’M IN THE HUMAN ZOO

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Animation, Screenwriting, Uncategorized

    My first radio interview will be broadcast tomorrow Tuesday 26th July, 1530hrs BBC Radio 4.  What’s the aural equivalent of ‘blink and you’ll miss it’?  Probably ‘poke your finger in your ear to scoop the wax out’.  Although if your ears are fairly clean you won’t miss it all as my bit was going to be about five minutes long.

    It came as a big surprise. That tremendous journalist, comic and role model Timandra Harkness got in touch to talk about how incongruous cinematic moments can throw us out of the film’s story world.  We’ve all groaned at plot holes and continuity errors but what about when a filmmaker does this sort of thing deliberately?  What’s going on and why? And why was the tremendous journalist, comic and role model Timandra Harkness asking me these sorts of questions?

    The Human Zoo looks at current events through the lens of psychology.  This episode is called News of An Atrocity, the Psychology of Rare Events and looks at why we are more attuned to the dangers of exceptional situations, such as acts of terrorism, than to more everyday threats such as a car crash.

    Part of the programme looks at how we use stories to make sense of the world around us. How the patterns, rhythms and themes of a constructed world help us deal with the fears and uncertainties of real life and contribute to our well being.  That was where I fitted in although I will have to listen to the programme myself to remember exactly what I said.  I know there was talk about Doctor Who, and the importance of getting the right breed of cow in your costume drama and I may even have said “Verfremdungseffekt”.  ‘m pretty sure I mentioned Gumball, Ned Stark’s death and David Lynch, although possibly not in that order.

    And we came up with the title of my forthcoming Screenwriting manual: “Bury the Wizard.”

    Thing is, I didn’t know I had a forthcoming screenwriting manual.  Another example of how life is full of plot holes.

  • 3RD GLOBAL SYMPOSIUM ON GENDER IN MEDIA

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Media Campaign, Children's stories, Children's TV, Education, Politics, Screenwriting, The Children's Media Foundation

    Very pleased to have been invited to this last week.   Not least because the magnificent Geena Davis was giving the keynote.  If I wasn’t me, I’d like to be her.  You can read more about her brilliant Geena Davis Institute here and its research into women and girls in film, or rather the lack of women and girls in film.  You can also see their excellent See Jane Video which is far more eloquent than me.

    Many of my fellow delegates were  interested in the lack of women in the film industry but the research and campaign goes further to show the lack of women and girls in the films themselves.   Don’t girls and women matter?  Is it really true that boys won’t watch girl protagonists but that girls are ok with watching boys?  Really?  Why do girls have to be the ones that give way on this?  What damage have we done, shoehorning our youngsters into gender roles?  I’ve always wanted more from life than fashion and boyfriends and I can’t understand why women continue to punish their bodies with high heels and uncomfortable corsetry.

    I got the feeling that the majority of the audience at the symposium would agree that women and girls deserve more from the media and from their lives.  I love the motto, “If she can see it, she can be it”.   It was generally felt that this starts right back in the early years, in kids’ media.  I totally agree and hope that there will be a major shift in kids’ content away from girls being bossy big sisters, the sensible ones and the sidekick/love interests.  I hope there will be an even split of protagonists and sidekicks and antagonists across the genders.  But what I hope most, is that the big profitable organisations (public, private, multinational… broadcasters, film companies, internet providers…)  that were represented at the symposium will not just say there needs to be change, but will pay for it: someone has to.  There were some wealthy players attending and applauding the See Jane campaign – I charmingly asked a couple about putting their money where their mouths were.  They fixed their smiles and moved on.  Obviously they didn’t see this Jane.

  • SOME VERY APPY NEWS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Books, Children's stories, Education, Screenwriting, Uncategorized

     

    tm_storytime_coverThere is now a Tee and Mo story live on the Cbeebies Storytime app.  And I wrote it!  Those lovely people at Plug-In Media asked me and I was more than happy to say yes.

    If you don’t know Tee and Mo, they are a delightful monkey mother and son combo who get up to all sorts of collaborative fun in the forest.  They collaborate together and also with you, the preschool child/care-giver in their Bafta nominated games (also found on the Cbeebies website).

    Narrated by BBC6 Music’s Lauren Laverne, Tee and Mo is the brainchild of Plug-In’s creative director Dominic Minns.  I love the way he and the other clever people at Plug-in have devised the games to encourage children and their adults to play the games together, to have fun and enjoy each other’s company.

    Who Did the Footprints is my first interactive story.  I want to say very clever things about extending the reading experience and kinesthetic learning but that would sound terribly dull and I’d much rather you and your Cbeebie went together and gave your Cbeebies Storytime app-watching device a good shake (You’ll understand once you’ve downloaded the story)  so I’ll just say that it was enormous fun writing it and I hope that you have enormous fun reading it.

    tm_storytime_interaction

     

     

     

  • AND THE WINNER IS…

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Media Campaign, Children's stories, Children's TV, Education, Religion, Screenwriting, The Children's Media Foundation, Uncategorized

    Me!  I had a brilliant evening at the Sandford St Martin 2015 Awards last night.  OK so I didn’t win an award, but then I wasn’t up for one: I was a juror.   But I came away from Lambeth Palace feeling like a winner.  The evening had celebrated some of the best, most thought provoking, meaningful and, in some cases, uplifting media content of the past year: radio and TV documentaries, sit coms, murder mysteries, period dramas, bio-pics and everything in between.  Some of the programmes had flown under the mainstream radar – the winner of the children’s award for example (Fettle Animation’s ‘Children of the Holocaust’ BBC 2) had first been broadcast at 4 in the morning as a teaching aid for schools! – so there were loads of titles that I came home wanting to seek out, others that I wanted to watch again.

    The best thing though was being in the presence of some quite outstandingly wonderful people.  Award ceremonies are always full of outstanding people, we’re there to celebrate the most talented after all.  But this room was full of people who were not only talented and not only nice but really rather wonderful:  men and women who clearly care about their work beyond personal ambition.

    The winners of the Sandford Awards are can be found at http://sandfordawards.org.uk/the-awards/2015-awards/2015-award-winners/ I think you can also view the programmes there.  Definitely worth it.

    So why did I feel like a winner myself?  Because:

    • I was privileged to meet  Trude Silman and her sister who not only survived the Holocaust but went on to achieve so much despite all that had happened to them.
    • I was thrilled to meet the BBC’s chief international correspondent Lyse Doucet and see the compassion she has for the people in the stories she has to cover.
    • I was delighted to be able to thank writer Peter Bowker in person for my favourite film of last year, ‘Marvellous’ and very pleased indeed to have the chance to shake the hand of the man at the heart of the story, Neil Baldwin.
    • And if you’ve seen the film you’ll understand how excited I was to see Neil get the Bishop of Leeds to sign his bible.

    But the best bit?

    The best bit, the bit I enjoyed most came right at the end when fellow juror Tim Herbert and the winners of the Children’s Award, Producer Kath Shackleton and Director Zane Whittingham of Fettle Animation and I were about to leave.  Standing in the hallowed hall, the home of the head of the Church of England, with its oak paneling and  Tudor fireplace, surrounded by oil paintings of all the Archbishops that have gone before,  surrounded by history and the host of unseen witnesses, the cry went up, “Anyone coming for a beer?”

    Like I said, I was in the presence of some quite outstandingly wonderful people.

     

  • WHY I WENT TO AFRICA…

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's stories, Education, Politics, Screenwriting, travel, Uncategorized

    No I didn’t go on safari and no I didn’t climb Kilimanjaro.

    Well I did sort of….

    Elephants

    I had the pleasure and privilege of staying on the border of the Arusha National Park and on the Masai Steppe in Tanzania with Kilimanjaro as my neighbour to research and write a screenplay for a new  initiative from Nature For Kids and the Sparkling Elephant Project: an exciting adventure film for children, working title…

    GOODWILL AND LIHWA AND THE TREASURE OF THE ELEPHANTS

    The African bush is full of dangers, especially if you’re only eleven years old and abandoned.  A boy and a young elephant both become victims of poaching. But just who is rescuing whom?

    My research included meeting with local children, Masai, rangers, farmers, ranchers, safari guides, tourists, government ministers and elephants and other wildlife. Obviously some I could get closer to than others.  It was both wonderful and awful and at times, like when I found these elephant remains, or watched a boy cut down another acacia tree for charcoal,  heartbreaking.

    Elephant Bones

    I’m not a trained conservationist or zoologist but having read and listened to people from all sides of the arguments, I truly believe that elephants play a more important role in our world wide ecology than we realise.  They may seem destructive but they are Africa’s gardeners, maintaining the rainforest (the planet’s lungs) – to be losing them at the unsustainable rate of one every fifteen minutes to ivory poachers is insanity: no elephants means no rainforest means no control over CO2 means no control over climate change means…  It is not just rhetoric but science-based knowledge when I say, “in saving the elephants we are saving ourselves”.

    The plan is for this film to be the backbone of a conservation initiative throughout Africa and China. Freely available to major conservation and tourism partners, there will be versions in multiple languages, English, Kiswahili, Mandarin for example but of course the beauty of film is that it tells a story visually and can go beyond words and their boundaries. It is hoped that the film will be the catalyst for everyone to rediscover elephants and bring the sparkle back to Africa before we lose them and ourselves forever.

  • 1ST WEEK OF JULY MEANS HENLEY FOR SOME BUT SHEFFIELD’S THE PLACE TO BE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Animation, Children's Media Campaign, Children's TV, Screenwriting

    My bags are packed ready for another brilliant Children’s Media Conference in Sheffield.  This year is the tenth anniversary which is something to celebrate.   If you have anything to do with children’s media (telly, games, online, publishing…) it is definitely the place to be and not just for those of us working in the UK.  Each year the international opportunities grow.  But it doesn’t lose it’s goodnatured, small industry feel.   This year I am once more  on the blogging team.   All of the sessions are blogged so nobody has to miss out.  You’ll be able to find the blogs, including mine, at www.thechildrensmediaconference.org

    I’ve posted two blogs already.  One involved a large onion for reasons that, well it was one of those ‘you had to be there’ moments and the other goes something like:

    Jayne’s Guide to Sheffield

    Sheffield Sheffield, it’s a wonderful town
    The Hubs are up and the Crucible’s down,
    Cinema 2 is in the hole in the ground,
    Sheffield, Sheffield, it’s wonderful town!

    Which I think goes to show that once  again ‘you have to be there’.