POLITICS

  • 3RD GLOBAL SYMPOSIUM ON GENDER IN MEDIA

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Media Campaign, Children's stories, Children's TV, Education, Politics, Screenwriting, The Children's Media Foundation

    Very pleased to have been invited to this last week.   Not least because the magnificent Geena Davis was giving the keynote.  If I wasn’t me, I’d like to be her.  You can read more about her brilliant Geena Davis Institute here and its research into women and girls in film, or rather the lack of women and girls in film.  You can also see their excellent See Jane Video which is far more eloquent than me.

    Many of my fellow delegates were  interested in the lack of women in the film industry but the research and campaign goes further to show the lack of women and girls in the films themselves.   Don’t girls and women matter?  Is it really true that boys won’t watch girl protagonists but that girls are ok with watching boys?  Really?  Why do girls have to be the ones that give way on this?  What damage have we done, shoehorning our youngsters into gender roles?  I’ve always wanted more from life than fashion and boyfriends and I can’t understand why women continue to punish their bodies with high heels and uncomfortable corsetry.

    I got the feeling that the majority of the audience at the symposium would agree that women and girls deserve more from the media and from their lives.  I love the motto, “If she can see it, she can be it”.   It was generally felt that this starts right back in the early years, in kids’ media.  I totally agree and hope that there will be a major shift in kids’ content away from girls being bossy big sisters, the sensible ones and the sidekick/love interests.  I hope there will be an even split of protagonists and sidekicks and antagonists across the genders.  But what I hope most, is that the big profitable organisations (public, private, multinational… broadcasters, film companies, internet providers…)  that were represented at the symposium will not just say there needs to be change, but will pay for it: someone has to.  There were some wealthy players attending and applauding the See Jane campaign – I charmingly asked a couple about putting their money where their mouths were.  They fixed their smiles and moved on.  Obviously they didn’t see this Jane.

  • CBEEBIES RADIO: POPPY’S DAY

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Books, Children's Poetry, Children's stories, Education, Politics

    My short story Poppy’s Day is available as a free download from CBeebies Radio today and for the next seven days.  Read by Falklands War veteran, Simon Weston,  and beautifully produced by John Leagas, the story marks the centenary of the First World War and introduces little listeners to bravery and the importance of remembering.

    I’ve just read the BBC press release, which says “is as powerful as it is poignant, a reminder about how important it is to remember not just the events of history, but the people.”  So that’s me feeling smug for the rest of the day.

    Follow the link above and if you don’t see a big picture of some poppies to click on.  Click on ‘Get This Week’s Podcasts’ and then again on ‘Download Radio Podcast’ and then on ‘CBeebies:Poppy’s Day’.

  • WHY I WENT TO AFRICA…

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's stories, Education, Politics, Screenwriting, travel, Uncategorized

    No I didn’t go on safari and no I didn’t climb Kilimanjaro.

    Well I did sort of….

    Elephants

    I had the pleasure and privilege of staying on the border of the Arusha National Park and on the Masai Steppe in Tanzania with Kilimanjaro as my neighbour to research and write a screenplay for a new  initiative from Nature For Kids and the Sparkling Elephant Project: an exciting adventure film for children, working title…

    GOODWILL AND LIHWA AND THE TREASURE OF THE ELEPHANTS

    The African bush is full of dangers, especially if you’re only eleven years old and abandoned.  A boy and a young elephant both become victims of poaching. But just who is rescuing whom?

    My research included meeting with local children, Masai, rangers, farmers, ranchers, safari guides, tourists, government ministers and elephants and other wildlife. Obviously some I could get closer to than others.  It was both wonderful and awful and at times, like when I found these elephant remains, or watched a boy cut down another acacia tree for charcoal,  heartbreaking.

    Elephant Bones

    I’m not a trained conservationist or zoologist but having read and listened to people from all sides of the arguments, I truly believe that elephants play a more important role in our world wide ecology than we realise.  They may seem destructive but they are Africa’s gardeners, maintaining the rainforest (the planet’s lungs) – to be losing them at the unsustainable rate of one every fifteen minutes to ivory poachers is insanity: no elephants means no rainforest means no control over CO2 means no control over climate change means…  It is not just rhetoric but science-based knowledge when I say, “in saving the elephants we are saving ourselves”.

    The plan is for this film to be the backbone of a conservation initiative throughout Africa and China. Freely available to major conservation and tourism partners, there will be versions in multiple languages, English, Kiswahili, Mandarin for example but of course the beauty of film is that it tells a story visually and can go beyond words and their boundaries. It is hoped that the film will be the catalyst for everyone to rediscover elephants and bring the sparkle back to Africa before we lose them and ourselves forever.

  • CHILD PERFORMERS GET A NEW DEAL

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Media Campaign, Children's Theatre, Children's TV, Education, Politics, The Children's Media Foundation, Uncategorized

    The New Year brought success for the All Party Parliamentary Group for Children’s Media and the Arts after six months of behind the scenes activity.Jayne Kirkham, CMF’s Clerk to the Group reports…
    At the 2013 APPG AGM in June, John McVay from PACT, and representatives from the major broadcasters and children’s charities discussed the inadequacies of child performance licensing regulations, as set out in the Children and Young Persons Act 1963.  Things looked pretty grim. Along with childcare professionals, Ofcom and others, the broadcasters and charities had worked hard to draw up recommendations to improve the regulations, only to have their hopes dashed, as the Government decided not to legislate on the issue. The reason given was a lack of consensus in the response to the Government’s formal consultation.
    The APPG event proved that there was consensus in the fundamental areas, and the Group’s Chair Baroness Floella Benjamin has been highlighting these since then:
    -The need for equal opportunities and equal safeguarding for children in all types of performance on all types of platform.
    -Effectively rationalising the differences between screen, stage, ‘theatrical’ performance (acting, singing, dancing), and performing as oneself (documentary, interview, reality).
    -Removing the ‘postcode lottery’ of different Local Education Authorities having their own regulations.
    The Department of Education may have abandoned the idea of new legislation but that didn’t mean it wasn’t still needed.
    But what to do?  The parliamentary calendar offered few options, but the Children and Families Bill was coursing through the legislative process and the changes to performance regulations were essentially concerned with child welfare.But you can’t just slip in an extra sentence or two to a parliamentary bill…  can you?Baroness Benjamin started digging around and unearthed procedures and people with whom she could firmly plant the idea of an amendment to the Children and Families Bill.  After passing through the Report Stage, the Bill has emerged with significant changes to child performance regulations.

    Tabled by Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Schools, Lord Nash, in brief, these amendments will:

    -Replace the complex restrictions on the hours children can perform at different ages, which were different for theatre and broadcast, with a simpler, single set of limits subject to age group (0-4, 5-10, 11-16).
    -Repeal the limit on the nature of the daily performances that a child can be licensed to take part in.
    -Remove the requirement for medical certificates.  These could still be requested by the local authority if, for example, there was cause for concern about a child’s health, but would not be a requirement.

    These changes, although seemingly small, will bring clarity and consistency to all Local Education Authorities: allowing them to monitor children performing abroad as well as at home, give children better protection and opportunity based on their individual needs and ensure that their welfare is paramount.The government amendments were discussed in the Lords on 29th January and the Bill’s third and final reading is today (Feb 5th).  Six months of carefully nurturing something the Department of Education threw out, and we’re seeing the Bill – and the all-important amendments – heading for Royal Assent.  The result should be safe, happy and healthy child performances in the future.For more information on The Children and Families Bill go to:
    http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2013-14/childrenandfamilies.html.

  • LET’S STOP CROWING ABOUT OUR BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTERS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Media Campaign, Education, Politics, Prix Jeunesse, The Children's Media Foundation, Uncategorized

    And celebrate their other qualities instead.  Like their kindness, courage, tenacity, empathy, sense of justice, compassion, generosity, ability to love and be loved.

    They may in fact be damn ugly physically and what’s wrong with that?  Who’s to say what is beautiful?  We are doing our children a grave disservice when our affirmations focus on their external appearance.  Of course they’re beautiful to us, because we love them. But we don’t love them because they’re beautiful.  But do they know that?

    What do they hear, what do they learn,  when with the best intentions we crow and brag about our ‘beautiful’ daughters, on Facebook, on Twitter and to our friends?

    I recently heard Dr Dafna Lemish talk about Girl Power, and I have to agree that Girl Power has empowered our daughters in two ways only:  sexual power and consumer power.   So after all this time, after all that the women’s movement has tried to do, daughters and mothers alike still unwittingly define and value themselves and each other according to whether they’re attractive, can pull, and stick their tits out.   And as consumers, we’ve grown demanding – ‘make it in pink and we’ll buy it’. ‘Born to Shop’?  Oh please.  No wonder women are  still not taken seriously.

    The Children’s Media Foundation has an event this coming Wednesday to discuss role models, representation and gender skew.  If you can go to it, do.   And let’s celebrate and affirm our daughters and our sons as wonderful human beings who can change the world because of who they are, not what they look like.

     

  • ON BEING AN “ESTEEMED EXPERT”

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Business Trips, Children's Media Campaign, Children's TV, Education, Politics, The Children's Media Foundation, travel, Uncategorized

    I liked it.

    I liked having all my travel arrangements made for me.

    He could have tried to look pleased to see me.

    He could have tried to look pleased to see me.

     

     

     

     

    I liked getting caught up in a motorcade with blue lights flashing and outriders.  An excellent way to get through Istanbul traffic as long as the the driver pulls back when the outriders start getting twitchy.

    I hope I'm never so important that I need to be reached at any moment.  But useful I suppose if you run out of paper.

    Useful I suppose if you run out of paper.

     

     

    I liked five star  accommodation.

     

    I liked my Turkish Bath.

     

    But who takes calls on the loo?  I hope I’m never that esteemed.

    And if you’ll forgive the unfortunate juxtaposition here, I liked delivering my paper.  If I wasn’t already full enough of my own self importance, they gave me two TWO interpreters: one into Turkish and the other Sign Language.

    My auditorium before everyone arrived.  If only I could flik-flak down this aisle.

    My auditorium before everyone arrived. If only I could flik-flak down this aisle.

     

     

    And published my speech in a REAL BOOK OF CLEVER THINGS BY CLEVER PEOPLE.

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    AND I very much liked getting caught up in the Deputy Prime Minister’s procession when we all went to dinner.  Top Tip: secret service people are not very secret and they don’t make good dinner conversation.

    Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc with Esteemed Experts.

    Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc with Esteemed Experts.

    Another top tip: if you mention politics to a politician, be prepared for facial expressions that can only be described as ‘inscrutable’.  Try as I might, I couldn’t scrute the Deputy Prime Minister.  I later learned I’d been mentioned in despatches and in a good way, but you’d never have scruted that at the time.

     

     

  • 1ST CHILDREN AND MEDIA CONGRESS IN TURKEY

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Media Campaign, Children's stories, Children's TV, Education, Politics, Prix Jeunesse

    I’ve just returned from the 1.Turkiye Cocuk ve Medya Kongresi in Istanbul-not Contantinople.

    Oh look, I tried then to take myself seriously but couldn’t even manage a sentence.

    I did however take the Kongresi seriously.  On behalf of the Children’s Media Foundation, I was invited to speak at this new conference and share some of the lessons we’ve learned in the last few years.

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    Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc opens the Congress.

     

    The Kongresi was set up by the Turkish deputy prime minister to develop a strategy for children and media.

     

    The two day event brought together representatives from across Turkey, adults, children and young people as well as “esteemed overseas experts” (about twenty professors and me) in child development, media studies (and me) and was, from my perspective brilliant.  It was superb having lots of young people involved and at the heart of things.

    And despite the language barriers (some interesting translations – “Our children are so intelligent, so beautiful and so clean” ), there was a fantastic spirit of collaboration and fun.

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    2400 people of all ages attempting to get on stage for a ‘family photo’

    It was disappointing not to see a stronger presence from the Turkish kids’ media industry.  I think they were invited and there were a number of trade stands but the talks, other than mine, Sabrina Unterstell from Prix Jeunesse, and kiwi programme makers Robyn Scott Vincent and Tanya Black were more from the media studies and media literacy POV, with titles such as “Cultural functions of the Cartoons”, and lots of words like pedagogy’, ‘positioning’.  My title was also rather dry – “Children’s Media and Systems Related to Policy Issues”, but never fear, I spiced it up with some jokes and, I have to say quite a lot of triumphalism.  But nobody left my session or fell asleep…

    In essence I explained how the Children’s Media Foundation came to be and what it had achieved.  The jokes and triumphalism weren’t strained or shoehorned in – since 2006, we have done a lot: I was going to list it all but you can read all that stuff over at www.thechildrensmediafoundation.org

    It all went down rather well – there were genuinely interested questions, the moderator Prof. Dr Davut Dursun – head of the Turkish Radio and Television Supreme Council – said it was “A critical presentation for the congress” and that “Congress should study this [our] model.”  And that the Children’s Media Foundation “served as an example.”   Go us.

     CMF logo cropped smaller2

    I had been in two minds about attending – of all the members of the Children’s Media Foundation executive, I have the least experience and the fewest letters after my name.  But I can tell the story of all that we have done and all that we want to do and who can argue with an airhead when she states that ‘children deserve the best media’?  So go me.

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    Volume 2 of Bildriler Kitabi – essays from the Kongressi ISBN-978-975-552-093-3

     Ooh and don’t you love that they made all the adult speakers submit photos of when they were children?

  • TODAY I GET TO SAY “MELLIFLUOUS” BECAUSE…

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Books, Children's Media Campaign, Children's Poetry, Children's stories, Education, Politics

    I’ve just remembered a brilliant thing someone said last Saturday.  Rather fascinated by bees at the moment.  As is everyone apparently.  Hating to follow the herd, I can smugly say that I’m not interested in keeping them because it’s trendy – my big sister inherited a hive and I like being like her.

    Whatever, the lovely ancient apiarist in Stroud market, advised me to wait a few years “When there will be lots of second hand equipment for sale as the herd move on.  First it was chickens…” he said.

    Then he said something else, and this is why I am writing before I forget it and fill my silly head with other chattery nonsense.

    He said, “My primary school teacher taught me to keep bees.”

    “Oh,” I gushed, picturing an Edwardian lady filling her country diary with bee keeping notes and thinking ‘how quaint, he must have grown up with Laurie Lee’.

    The elderly bee keeper clearly knew I was filling my head with bucollocks (that’s rustic nonsense) so added,  “She taught me to read.”

    She taught me to read.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • JAYNE’S OLDS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Animation, Children's Media Campaign, Children's stories, Children's TV, Paddlesport, Politics

    Well I can’t call it ‘News’ when it happened so long ago.  It’s not that nothing happens in Jayne World, it’s just that I’m having too much fun doing whatever it is to write about it.  And then something else comes along and well, I don’t like to brag.

    Really?

    OK yes I LOVE TO BRAG.  I want to shout a lot about all the brilliant things I’m up to but I wasn’t brought up to do that and so a massive knob of guilt sticks like an uncooked crumble clags in my throat and I politely slip away to a quiet corner to cough it up and somehow, amid all the spluttering and gagging, whatever it was I wanted to SHOUT about suddenly doesn’t seem so important.

    August is a great excuse not to blog – everyone’s away doing family holiday stuff and-or writing their great tome.  I did neither.  I spent August (and September come to that)  jamming with bees.  Well they were honeying but it all ended up on fresh bread and butter.  AND I WON ROSETTES.  Ooh, that was almost a brag.

    There was loads of other stuff that I should have classed as News but is now Olds. But it’s all covered by NDAs and will have to wait until the TV SHOWS are broadcast.  There will be BRAGGING then. Maybe.  Depends how the TV SHOWS turn out I guess.  All I can say is that it was Preschool mainly this summer.

    And I did the annual party conferences again.

    Preschool and Politics.

    You can see how well joined up my life is.  When I say, ‘did’ the conferences – I watched a lot of stuff on Telly, read lots of press releases, sat on the beach at Brighton and decided I probably wouldn’t do it next year.  The Libdems were too far away in Glasgow (couldn’t afford the fare) so I relied on their press releases and live debates and twitter feeds, the Tories wouldn’t give me a press pass so I didn’t go anywhere near Manchester.  I did however go to Brighton for the Labour bunfight (cheap ticket and a friend put me up).

    I must must must write about all that seperately and I will.  If not here, then on the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain website.  Because I’m a MEMBER OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL and have been for some time.  Ooh another brag.  Go me.

    But the best thing that happened all summer; the really very bestest best thing happened on the river.  Thames.  Pangbourne.  90 brand new year sevens all coming to Adventure Dolphin for a ‘getting to know you’- ‘teambuilding’-‘secondary school teachers are great’ sort of day.  The weather and river conditions were perfect for… BLACKBERRIES.  Scoffing our faces with berries only accessible to those in small canoes, free from dog piddle and traffic fumes – it’s surprising how quickly you get to know each other standing in a boat close to thorn bushes, how well you work as a team to get the best berries and how great the teachers really are when they’re soaking wet.  Not sure how to BRAG about that – it’s not really news; just a complete joy to be a part of. Of course I WAS EXCELLENT spotting the blackberries and their potential in the first place….

    Other Olds in brief:

    • Was involved a tiny bit in some amendments to the Children and Families’ Bill currently making its way through Parliament. Tiny BRAG
    • Was “2nd Best in Show” –  Would have BRAGGED about it before but it was a Dog Show and thought, as I don’t have a dog,  ‘second best in show’ didn’t sound like something to brag about.  But I do make good jam.
    • Briefed a shadow secretary of state.  Oh I wish I could say more and BRAG but the Guilt Crumble is clagging again – must add some blackberries.
    • And I took up bell ringing.  Not really a BRAG yet.  BUT I’VE ONLY SKINNED MY FINGER ONCE.  Brag.

    So once more I’m up to date on My News.  That is something to BRAG about.