CHILDREN'S POETRY

  • TODAY I GET TO SAY “MELLIFLUOUS” BECAUSE…

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Books, Children's Media Campaign, Children's Poetry, Children's stories, Education, Politics

    I’ve just remembered a brilliant thing someone said last Saturday.  Rather fascinated by bees at the moment.  As is everyone apparently.  Hating to follow the herd, I can smugly say that I’m not interested in keeping them because it’s trendy – my big sister inherited a hive and I like being like her.

    Whatever, the lovely ancient apiarist in Stroud market, advised me to wait a few years “When there will be lots of second hand equipment for sale as the herd move on.  First it was chickens…” he said.

    Then he said something else, and this is why I am writing before I forget it and fill my silly head with other chattery nonsense.

    He said, “My primary school teacher taught me to keep bees.”

    “Oh,” I gushed, picturing an Edwardian lady filling her country diary with bee keeping notes and thinking ‘how quaint, he must have grown up with Laurie Lee’.

    The elderly bee keeper clearly knew I was filling my head with bucollocks (that’s rustic nonsense) so added,  “She taught me to read.”

    She taught me to read.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • A LITTLE KNOWN CHARACTER IN THE EASTER STORY…

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Books, Children's Poetry, Children's stories

    Once upon a seabed, there lived a sponge.   Giving a home to lots of tiny creatures, it felt happy and important wafting in the waters.  Then along came a net, which scooped it up and dumped it onto a boat with lots of wriggling fish.  Some big hairy hands had picked it out.  But instead of throwing it back into the sea, the big hairy hands left it on deck in the sun.  The boat sailed home and now the sponge was miles away from its home, snatched from its family and friends, all dried out and very grumpy.

    “I don’t deserve this! Why me?” thought the grumpy sponge.  “Thing’s can’t possibly get worse.”  He heard some sloshing and thought, “Ah good, at least I can soak up some water.”  But it wasn’t water:  he suddenly found himself dunked in vinegar!  Vinegar!  Somebody said it was wine but it tasted horrid. All the little houses where the tiny creatures had lived filled up and the sponge felt horribly tingly, like being stung by a thousand sea anemones, which he was once, when he’d made a rude remark about their tentacles.

    “I don’t deserve this! Why me?” hiccupped the grumpy sponge. “Things can’t possibly get worse.” But then they stuck him on a stick!  He’d once been poked by an inquisitive swordfish, and been very cross about it.   But at least the swordfish hadn’t hoiked him into the air and waved him about!  The sponge didn’t like air at the best of times.  Now he was swaying to and fro, this way and that, as he was raised higher and higher, dripping vinegar.

    “I don’t deserve this! Why me?” swooned the grumpy sponge. “Things can’t possibly get worse.”  But then he came face to face with a man nailed onto some bits of a tree.  This man had been snatched from his family and friends,  poked and pierced and now been hoiked into the air.

    The people below pushed the sponge up to the man’s lips for him to take a drink. The man’s face was full of pain and pressure, as if he’d been stung by a hundred thousand sea anemones, poked by all the swordfishes in the sea and had the weight of all the water in the world pressing down on him.  But the sponge saw that this man wasn’t angry or even grumpy, even though he was in agony.  In fact this man was full of love: love for the people that had snatched him away, or had laughed at him, even the ones that had hoiked him into the air.  Despite the pain and pressure, this man’s face was full of love for everyone.

    As the sponge was lowered, he didn’t feel grumpy anymore.  When he had touched this man’s lips, he’d been kissed by the greatest love in the world. “I don’t deserve this! Why me?”

    Happy Easter everyone.

  • ON SCRAMBLED PLANS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Children's Poetry, Uncategorized

    There’s a big boiled egg
    Sitting in the Quiet Carriage.
    And he’s loud and he’s rude
    And in a very bad mood;
    For this train is going to Bristol
    And he wants to go to Harwich.
    So he shouts and has a moan
    To his friend on his phone,
    And forgets he’s not alone,
    Sitting in the Quiet Carriage.
    “Shush and hush,”
    Whispers the friendly guard.
    But the boiled egg is hard
    And intimidates the guard.
    So politely we all make
    A stand, in the Quiet Carriage,
    Till he cracks and backtracks;
    ‘Cause he’s really soft and runny.
    And it’s very very funny
    When a big boiled egg
    Who wants to go to Harwich,
    Gets on the wrong train
    And sits in the quiet carriage.
    15.3.13

  • IF YOU’RE A SHREW LIVING UNDER THE COOKER AT MY HOUSE, LIFE HAS JUST BECOME MORE… CHALLENGING

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Animation, Books, Children's Poetry, Children's Theatre, Children's TV, Uncategorized

    A Warning to Little Shrews

    Winston the cat
    Is big, black and fat.
    But his mew is so cute,
    You’d never guess he’s a brute
    Who likes to kill rats
    And other tom cats.

    He curls on the chair
    With a warm sleepy stare.
    But when you think he’s at rest,
    He’s at his cruel, vicious best.
    So little shrew beware:
    Winston knows that you’re there.

    He’s watching you peep
    And feel safe and then creep
    To the fridg- Bam! goes his paw
    As he strikes with his claw
    And sinks his teeth deep
    And eats even your squeap!

    Please note: ‘Squeap’ is the sound a shrew makes as it disappears in one big gollop into a big black fat cat.  There’s no time for squealing and or squeaking – the k gets swallowed.  Trust me.